Understanding the Different Terms Used to Describe Body Image Issues

Body image issues are a common concern for many individuals, and there are various terms used to describe this problem. Understanding these terms can help in identifying and addressing the issue. In this article, we will explore the different terms used to describe body image issues and provide a comprehensive understanding of the topic.

Body image issues can be referred to as various terms such as body dysmorphia, body dissatisfaction, negative body image, and eating disorders. These terms have different meanings and are used in different contexts. For instance, body dysmorphia is a medical condition where an individual has a distorted perception of their physical appearance, while body dissatisfaction refers to a general unhappiness with one’s body. Negative body image is a term used to describe a person’s perception of their body as unattractive or flawed. Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are mental health conditions that involve extreme food restriction and/or binge eating and purging behaviors.

By understanding these different terms, individuals can identify which term best describes their body image issues and seek appropriate treatment. In the following sections, we will explore each term in more detail and provide examples of how they manifest in real-life situations.

What is body image?

Definition and explanation

Body image refers to a person’s perception and attitudes towards their own body. It encompasses both how one views their physical appearance and the emotions and thoughts associated with that perception.

  • Physical appearance:
    • External features such as height, weight, shape, and proportions.
    • Internal features such as skin, hair, and eye color.
  • Emotions and thoughts:
    • Positive or negative feelings towards one’s body.
    • Self-esteem, self-worth, and self-acceptance.
    • Comparisons to societal ideals or others’ bodies.

Body image can be influenced by various factors, including:

  • Genetics: Some people may be predisposed to certain body types due to genetic factors.
  • Environment: Cultural, social, and family norms can shape how one perceives their body.
  • Media: Exposure to unrealistic beauty standards in advertising and social media can contribute to negative body image.
  • Personal experiences: Traumatic events or life changes can affect body image and self-perception.

A healthy body image involves accepting and appreciating one’s body for its unique qualities and function, rather than striving for an unattainable ideal. It is important to recognize that body image is not fixed and can change over time, and that every individual deserves respect and acceptance regardless of their physical appearance.

The importance of body image

Body image is the perception that an individual has about their own body. It includes not only the way a person looks, but also their thoughts and feelings about their body. Body image is important because it can affect many aspects of a person’s life, including their self-esteem, self-confidence, and overall mental health.

A negative body image can lead to a variety of issues, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. It can also affect a person’s relationships and ability to function in their daily life. On the other hand, a positive body image can lead to greater self-esteem, self-confidence, and overall well-being.

Therefore, understanding the different terms used to describe body image issues is crucial for recognizing and addressing these issues in individuals. By using accurate language and terminology, we can better understand and support those who may be struggling with body image issues.

Common terms used to describe body image issues

Key takeaway: Understanding the different terms used to describe body image issues is crucial for recognizing and addressing these issues in individuals. Body image refers to a person’s perception and attitudes towards their own body, including physical appearance and emotions/thoughts. It can be influenced by various factors and can affect many aspects of a person’s life. Common terms used to describe body image issues include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, body dysmorphia, bigorexia, and orthorexia. These conditions can have serious physical and mental health consequences and require professional treatment. Seeking professional help is important for addressing body image issues, and treatment options may include therapy, medication, and self-help strategies. It is important to remember that everyone’s journey to addressing body image issues is unique and that a healthy body image involves accepting and appreciating one’s body for its unique qualities and function.

Anorexia nervosa

Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder characterized by a distorted body image and an intense fear of gaining weight. People with anorexia nervosa may restrict their food intake, excessively exercise, and engage in other behaviors to maintain a low body weight.

  • Physical symptoms: Anorexia nervosa can cause a wide range of physical symptoms, including fatigue, dizziness, weakness, hair loss, and digestive problems.
  • Psychological symptoms: People with anorexia nervosa may experience depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. They may also have distorted thoughts about their body image and weight.
  • Health consequences: Anorexia nervosa can have serious health consequences, including malnutrition, organ damage, and even death. It is important to seek help if you or someone you know is struggling with anorexia nervosa.

Treatment for anorexia nervosa typically involves a combination of therapy, nutrition counseling, and medical monitoring. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is often used to help people with anorexia nervosa challenge their distorted thoughts and beliefs about their body image and weight. Nutrition counseling can help people learn healthy eating habits and address any nutritional deficiencies. Medical monitoring is important to ensure that people are receiving adequate nutrition and to monitor for any potential health complications.

If you or someone you know is struggling with anorexia nervosa, it is important to seek help from a qualified mental health professional.

Bulimia nervosa

Bulimia nervosa is a serious eating disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors such as self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, or misuse of laxatives or diuretics. People with bulimia nervosa may feel a lack of control over their eating and have a distorted body image, seeing themselves as overweight even when they are underweight.

This disorder is often associated with psychological factors such as low self-esteem, perfectionism, and a fear of gaining weight. It can also be linked to cultural and societal pressures that promote a thin ideal and the belief that one’s worth is tied to their appearance.

People with bulimia nervosa may experience a range of physical and psychological symptoms, including:

  • Gastrointestinal problems, such as sore throat, swollen salivary glands, and tooth decay
  • Dental problems, such as enamel erosion and tooth discoloration
  • Heart problems, such as an irregular heartbeat or heart failure
  • Skin problems, such as dry skin or hair loss
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Mood changes, such as depression or anxiety

Bulimia nervosa can have serious consequences for physical and mental health, and it is important to seek help from a healthcare professional if you or someone you know is struggling with this disorder. Treatment may include therapy, medication, and nutritional counseling to address the underlying psychological and emotional factors that contribute to the disorder.

Binge eating disorder

Binge eating disorder (BED) is a serious mental health condition characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating, which involves consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time, often accompanied by feelings of a lack of control over eating. People with BED may also experience guilt, shame, and depression as a result of their binge eating behaviors.

Some of the key features of BED include:

  • Eating large amounts of food in a short period of time, often faster than normal
  • Lack of control over eating during the episode
  • Eating even when not hungry
  • Eating until feeling uncomfortably full
  • Eating large amounts of food alone, in secret
  • Feeling guilty, ashamed, or disgusted after overeating
  • Binge eating is associated with significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning

BED is the most common eating disorder in the United States, affecting about 2.8% of adults, and it is more prevalent in women than in men. People with BED may also have other mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety, or substance abuse.

BED can have serious physical health consequences, including obesity, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease. Treatment for BED typically involves a combination of psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and medication, such as antidepressants, to address both the eating disorder and any co-occurring mental health conditions.

Body dysmorphia

Body dysmorphia, also known as dysmorphophobia, is a mental health condition characterized by a preoccupation with a perceived flaw or defect in one’s appearance. This preoccupation can cause significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning.

Causes

The exact causes of body dysmorphia are not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. Individuals with a history of childhood trauma, such as abuse or neglect, may be at a higher risk for developing body dysmorphia.

Symptoms

Symptoms of body dysmorphia can vary in severity and may include:

  • Preoccupation with a perceived flaw or defect in appearance
  • Repetitive behaviors, such as excessive grooming or skin picking
  • Constant comparison of one’s appearance to others
  • Avoidance of social situations or activities due to embarrassment or fear of being judged
  • Depression, anxiety, or other mental health conditions

Diagnosis

Body dysmorphia is typically diagnosed by a mental health professional, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist, following a comprehensive evaluation of the individual’s symptoms and medical history.

Treatment

Treatment for body dysmorphia typically involves a combination of psychotherapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). It is important to seek professional help if you are experiencing symptoms of body dysmorphia, as untreated, it can lead to significant impairment in daily functioning and quality of life.

Bigorexia

Bigorexia, also known as muscle dysmorphia, is a term used to describe a condition in which individuals become preoccupied with the idea of becoming more muscular, even when they are already muscular. This preoccupation can lead to excessive exercise, strict dieting, and the use of anabolic steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs.

While the term “bigorexia” is not as well-known as other eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia, it is still a serious condition that can have significant negative effects on an individual’s physical and mental health. People with bigorexia may experience depression, anxiety, and social isolation, as well as physical health problems such as injuries from excessive exercise or organ damage from the use of performance-enhancing drugs.

It is important to note that bigorexia is not simply a desire to be more muscular, but rather a compulsion that interferes with an individual’s daily life and relationships. Treatment for bigorexia typically involves therapy to address the underlying psychological issues and behavioral changes to address the compulsion to exercise and diet excessively.

Orthorexia

Orthorexia is a term used to describe an excessive preoccupation with healthy eating, which can lead to a distorted and unhealthy relationship with food. People with orthorexia may be fixated on consuming only “pure” or “clean” foods, and may avoid certain foods due to their perceived impurity. This obsession with healthy eating can lead to social isolation, as well as physical and mental health problems.

While orthorexia is not an official eating disorder recognized by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), it is a term that is increasingly being used in the mental health community to describe a pattern of behavior that can have serious consequences for an individual’s physical and mental health.

Causes of orthorexia can vary, but often stem from a desire to control one’s environment and achieve a sense of purity or perfection. Some people may turn to orthorexia as a way to cope with stress or anxiety, while others may be influenced by societal pressure to maintain a certain standard of health or appearance.

Orthorexia can have a number of negative consequences, including malnutrition, social isolation, and depression. People with orthorexia may also experience a reduced quality of life, as well as difficulty maintaining relationships and pursuing activities they once enjoyed.

Treatment for orthorexia typically involves cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which can help individuals identify and challenge distorted thoughts and beliefs about food and health. In some cases, medication may also be used to address co-occurring mental health conditions, such as depression or anxiety. Support groups can also be a helpful resource for individuals struggling with orthorexia, as they provide a safe and supportive environment for individuals to share their experiences and receive support from others who understand their struggles.

Other related terms

  • Disordered eating: A term used to describe any eating pattern that is abnormal or disruptive to a person’s physical and emotional health. This can include restrictive eating, binge eating, and purging behaviors.
  • Negative body image: A person’s subjective perception of their own body, which is often characterized by feelings of shame, inadequacy, and self-consciousness.
  • Body dissatisfaction: A person’s negative feelings or thoughts about their own body, which can lead to a desire to change their appearance.
  • Body shame: A feeling of intense embarrassment or humiliation about one’s body, often accompanied by feelings of disgust or self-hatred.
  • Appearance evaluation: A person’s tendency to assess their own appearance based on societal standards and cultural ideals, which can lead to feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem.
  • Fitness obsession: An excessive focus on physical fitness and exercise, often driven by a desire to achieve a certain body shape or size.
  • Objectification: The act of treating a person as an object or commodity to be looked at or used, rather than as a human being with autonomy and agency.
  • Social comparison: The tendency to compare oneself to others, often based on physical appearance, which can lead to feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem.
  • Mirror anxiety: A fear or anxiety about looking at one’s own reflection in a mirror, often accompanied by feelings of shame or self-consciousness.
  • Bigorexia: A term used to describe an extreme preoccupation with muscularity and a desire to increase muscle mass, often leading to dangerous behaviors such as excessive exercise and steroid use.
  • Muscle dysmorphia: A term used to describe a preoccupation with achieving a muscular and lean physique, often leading to dangerous behaviors such as excessive exercise and steroid use.

Eating disorders

Eating disorders are a group of mental health conditions characterized by an unhealthy relationship with food and an obsessive focus on body weight and shape. There are several types of eating disorders, including:

  • Anorexia nervosa: A condition in which a person restricts their food intake to an extreme degree, leading to severe weight loss and malnutrition.
  • Bulimia nervosa: A condition in which a person engages in repeated episodes of binge eating followed by purging, such as vomiting or using laxatives, to prevent weight gain.
  • Binge eating disorder: A condition in which a person engages in regular episodes of binge eating, consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time, often leading to feelings of shame and guilt.
  • Other specified feeding or eating disorders (OSFED): A catch-all category for eating disorders that do not meet the full criteria for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder, but still cause significant distress and impairment in daily life.

Eating disorders can have serious physical and mental health consequences, including malnutrition, organ damage, and an increased risk of suicide. Treatment for eating disorders typically involves a combination of individual therapy, family therapy, and medical interventions to address any physical health problems. It is important to seek help as soon as possible if you or someone you know is struggling with an eating disorder.

Mental health conditions

Body image issues can be closely linked to mental health conditions. These conditions can include:

  • Anorexia nervosa: A serious eating disorder characterized by a distorted body image and an intense fear of gaining weight. People with anorexia may restrict their food intake to an extreme degree, resulting in significant weight loss and malnutrition.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Another eating disorder, bulimia is defined by recurrent episodes of binge eating followed by behaviors intended to compensate for the excessive food intake, such as purging or excessive exercise. This can lead to a range of physical and psychological health problems.
  • Binge eating disorder: Binge eating is characterized by consuming large amounts of food in a short period of time, often accompanied by feelings of loss of control. This can result in weight gain and negative body image issues.
  • Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD): BDD is a mental health condition in which an individual becomes preoccupied with a perceived flaw or defect in their appearance. This can lead to obsessive behaviors and negative thoughts about their body image.
  • Muscle dysmorphia: Also known as “bigorexia,” this condition is characterized by an intense preoccupation with gaining muscle mass and a distorted body image. People with muscle dysmorphia may engage in excessive exercise and weightlifting, and may use performance-enhancing drugs.

These mental health conditions can have serious consequences for an individual’s physical and emotional well-being. It is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of these conditions and seek professional help if necessary.

Cultural and societal factors

Cultural and societal factors play a significant role in shaping individuals’ perceptions of their bodies and influencing body image issues. These factors can include:

  • Media portrayal of idealized body types: The media often presents unrealistic and often unattainable body ideals, which can contribute to negative body image and low self-esteem.
  • Gender norms and expectations: Societal expectations and gender norms around physical appearance and behavior can lead to body dissatisfaction and anxiety, particularly for women and girls.
  • Cultural beliefs and practices: Different cultures have unique beliefs and practices related to body image, which can either promote or hinder positive body image development.
  • Family and peer influences: Family and peer relationships can have a significant impact on an individual’s body image, as they often shape the way one perceives their own body and the bodies of others.
  • Historical context: Historical events and cultural shifts can also influence the way society views and talks about body image, with some cultures experiencing changes in attitudes towards body image in recent years.

Understanding the different terms

Differences between anorexia and bulimia

Anorexia and bulimia are two distinct eating disorders that affect an individual’s body image and self-esteem. While both disorders involve distorted body image and a strong desire to maintain a thin figure, they differ in terms of the specific symptoms and behaviors associated with them.

Anorexia

Anorexia, or anorexia nervosa, is an eating disorder characterized by a persistent restriction of food intake that leads to a significantly low body weight. People with anorexia often have a distorted body image and see themselves as overweight, even when they are severely underweight. They may also engage in excessive exercise and engage in behaviors such as purging or binge eating followed by purging.

Anorexia can have serious physical consequences, including malnutrition, organ damage, and even death. It can also lead to mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Bulimia

Bulimia, or bulimia nervosa, is an eating disorder characterized by a cycle of binge eating and purging. People with bulimia may eat large amounts of food in a short period of time, then purge by vomiting, using laxatives, or exercising excessively to compensate for the food consumed. This cycle can lead to a sense of guilt and shame, and the individual may feel out of control and helpless to stop the behavior.

Bulimia can also have serious physical consequences, including digestive problems, tooth decay, and electrolyte imbalances. It can also lead to mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse.

In summary, while anorexia and bulimia share some similarities in terms of distorted body image and a desire to maintain a thin figure, they differ in terms of the specific symptoms and behaviors associated with each disorder. Anorexia is characterized by a restriction of food intake that leads to a low body weight, while bulimia involves a cycle of binge eating and purging. Both disorders can have serious physical and mental health consequences and require professional treatment.

Differences between binge eating disorder and body dysmorphia

Binge eating disorder (BED) and body dysmorphia (BDD) are two distinct eating disorders that involve distorted body image perceptions. However, there are key differences between the two.

  • Prevalence: BED is the most common eating disorder, affecting around 2-3% of the population, while BDD affects around 1-2%.
  • Symptoms: BED involves episodes of binge eating, followed by feelings of guilt and shame. BDD involves a preoccupation with a perceived flaw or defect in one’s appearance, leading to significant distress and impairment in social or occupational functioning.
  • Causes: The causes of BED and BDD are complex and can involve genetic, environmental, and psychological factors.
  • Treatment: Both disorders require treatment from a mental health professional, such as a therapist or psychiatrist. Treatment for BED typically involves cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and/or medication, while treatment for BDD may involve CBT, medication, or a combination of both.

Understanding these differences is crucial for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of individuals struggling with body image issues.

Similarities and differences between bigorexia and orthorexia

Bigorexia and orthorexia are two terms used to describe distinct types of body image issues. While they share some similarities, there are also key differences between the two.

Similarities

One of the main similarities between bigorexia and orthorexia is the focus on a particular type of appearance. In both cases, individuals place a high value on a certain type of physical appearance, whether it be having a lean and muscular physique or having a fit and toned body. This can lead to an excessive preoccupation with diet and exercise, as well as a strong desire to achieve a specific look.

Another similarity between bigorexia and orthorexia is the potential for negative effects on mental health. Both conditions can lead to feelings of anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, as well as an increased risk of developing an eating disorder.

Differences

Despite these similarities, there are also important differences between bigorexia and orthorexia. One of the main differences is the specific type of appearance that is desired. While bigorexia is focused on achieving a lean and muscular physique, orthorexia is focused on achieving a fit and toned body. This means that individuals with bigorexia may be more likely to engage in activities such as weightlifting or bodybuilding, while individuals with orthorexia may be more likely to engage in activities such as cardio or yoga.

Another key difference between bigorexia and orthorexia is the specific behaviors that are associated with each condition. Bigorexia is often characterized by an excessive focus on weightlifting or other forms of resistance training, as well as a tendency to engage in other behaviors that may increase muscle mass. Orthorexia, on the other hand, is often characterized by an excessive focus on healthy eating and a tendency to restrict certain types of foods or food groups.

Overall, while bigorexia and orthorexia share some similarities, they are distinct conditions with their own unique characteristics and associated behaviors. Understanding these differences can help individuals better understand and address their own body image issues.

Seeking help for body image issues

Importance of seeking professional help

It is important to seek professional help when dealing with body image issues. This is because these issues can have a significant impact on a person’s mental health and overall well-being. Seeking professional help can provide individuals with the tools and support they need to manage their body image concerns and improve their self-esteem.

There are several reasons why seeking professional help is important when dealing with body image issues. One reason is that these issues can often be accompanied by other mental health conditions, such as anxiety or depression. A mental health professional can help individuals identify and address these underlying issues, as well as provide them with coping strategies to manage their body image concerns.

Another reason why seeking professional help is important is that body image issues can be deeply ingrained and difficult to change on one’s own. A mental health professional can provide individuals with the support and guidance they need to challenge negative thoughts and beliefs about their bodies, and work towards a more positive body image.

Finally, seeking professional help can also provide individuals with a safe and confidential space to talk about their body image concerns. This can be especially important for individuals who may feel embarrassed or ashamed about their body image issues, and may not feel comfortable discussing them with friends or family members.

Overall, seeking professional help is an important step towards managing body image issues and improving overall mental health and well-being.

Treatment options for body image issues

There are various treatment options available for individuals struggling with body image issues. It is important to seek professional help as body image issues can have a significant impact on one’s mental health and overall well-being.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a common form of therapy used to treat body image issues. CBT helps individuals identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviors related to their body image. It focuses on the present and teaches individuals skills to manage their thoughts and feelings about their body.

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) is another form of therapy that can be helpful for individuals struggling with body image issues. IPT focuses on improving interpersonal relationships and communication skills. It helps individuals identify and address underlying issues that may be contributing to their body image concerns.

Group Therapy

Group therapy can also be a helpful treatment option for individuals struggling with body image issues. In a group setting, individuals can share their experiences and learn from others who are going through similar struggles. Group therapy can provide a supportive environment and help individuals feel less isolated in their struggles.

Medication

In some cases, medication may be used to treat body image issues. Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may be prescribed to help manage symptoms of depression and anxiety related to body image concerns. However, medication should only be used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan and under the guidance of a medical professional.

It is important to remember that everyone’s journey to addressing body image issues is unique. Treatment options should be tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances. With the right support and resources, individuals can overcome body image concerns and improve their overall well-being.

Self-help strategies for improving body image

While seeking professional help is often necessary for addressing severe body image issues, there are also several self-help strategies that can be employed to improve one’s body image. These strategies involve adopting healthy behaviors and attitudes towards one’s body, which can lead to increased self-esteem and overall well-being.

Cognitive restructuring

Cognitive restructuring is a technique that involves identifying and challenging negative thoughts and beliefs about one’s body. By learning to recognize and challenge these thoughts, individuals can develop a more positive and realistic attitude towards their bodies. This can involve reframing negative thoughts, such as “I’m so fat,” to “I’m healthy and strong.”

Mindfulness and meditation

Mindfulness and meditation practices can also be helpful in improving body image. These practices involve focusing on the present moment and accepting one’s thoughts and feelings without judgment. By practicing mindfulness and meditation, individuals can learn to detach from negative thoughts and emotions and develop a more positive relationship with their bodies.

Exercise and physical activity

Regular exercise and physical activity can also help improve body image. Exercise can increase feelings of self-esteem and confidence, and can also help individuals develop a more positive relationship with their bodies. It is important to choose forms of exercise that are enjoyable and sustainable, such as yoga or dancing, rather than adopting unhealthy behaviors like excessive exercise or restrictive dieting.

Social support

Finally, social support can be a crucial factor in improving body image. Surrounding oneself with supportive and positive individuals can help individuals feel more confident and accepted. Additionally, seeking out communities or support groups that focus on body positivity and self-acceptance can provide individuals with a safe and supportive environment to discuss their feelings and experiences related to body image.

Additional resources for body image issues

If you are struggling with body image issues, it is important to seek help from a qualified professional. There are many resources available to support you on your journey towards a healthier relationship with your body.

One helpful resource is the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA). NEDA is a non-profit organization that provides resources and support for individuals struggling with eating disorders and body image issues. They offer a helpline that is staffed by trained volunteers who can provide support and guidance, as well as connect you with local treatment options.

Another resource to consider is therapy. A therapist who specializes in body image issues can help you work through the underlying emotional and psychological factors that contribute to your body image concerns. They can also provide you with coping strategies and tools to help you manage your thoughts and feelings about your body.

It is also important to seek support from friends and family. Talking to someone you trust about your body image issues can be a helpful first step in seeking help. They may be able to offer support and understanding, and can help you connect with additional resources if needed.

Additionally, there are many online resources available that can provide support and guidance for body image issues. Websites such as BodyPositive.com and TheBodyImage.org offer articles, videos, and support groups for individuals struggling with body image concerns.

Remember, seeking help for body image issues is a brave and important step towards improving your overall well-being. With the right support and resources, you can learn to cultivate a healthier relationship with your body and develop a more positive self-image.

FAQs

1. What are body image issues?

Body image issues refer to negative thoughts and feelings about one’s own body. This can include feelings of disgust, shame, or inadequacy, and can often lead to low self-esteem and depression.

2. What are some common body image issues?

Some common body image issues include body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. These conditions can cause individuals to obsess over their appearance and engage in harmful behaviors in an attempt to change their body shape or size.

3. What is body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)?

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a mental health condition in which individuals obsess over a perceived flaw or defect in their appearance. This can lead to significant distress and impairment in daily functioning.

4. What is anorexia nervosa?

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by a fear of gaining weight and a distorted body image. Individuals with anorexia may restrict their food intake, excessively exercise, and engage in other behaviors to maintain a low body weight.

5. What is bulimia nervosa?

Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by a cycle of binge eating and purging behaviors. Individuals with bulimia may eat large amounts of food and then engage in behaviors such as vomiting or using laxatives to prevent weight gain.

6. What are some other terms used to describe body image issues?

Body image issues may also be referred to as appearance-related anxiety, body dissatisfaction, or negative body image.

Our Bodies are Not an Image | Mary Jelkovsky | TEDxCherryCreekWomen

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