When is a Gluten-Free Diet Recommended by Doctors? A Comprehensive Guide

Are you curious about why a doctor might recommend a gluten-free diet? Perhaps you’ve heard the term “gluten-free” tossed around at the grocery store or seen a friend’s Instagram post boasting a gluten-free meal. But what exactly is gluten, and why would a doctor recommend eliminating it from your diet? In this comprehensive guide, we’ll explore the reasons behind a doctor’s recommendation for a gluten-free diet, including celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, and other related conditions. Get ready to discover the fascinating world of gluten and why it matters for your health.

What is Gluten and Why is it Important to Understand?

Understanding Gluten

Gluten is a protein found in certain grains, including wheat, barley, and rye. It is responsible for the elasticity and texture of dough, giving bread its chewy texture. Gluten is also found in many processed foods, including sauces, dressings, and cereals.

Understanding gluten is important for those who may have gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. Gluten sensitivity refers to gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms experienced by individuals who have an immune response to gluten-containing foods, while celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the small intestine when gluten is ingested.

For those with celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is essential to prevent damage to the small intestine and reduce symptoms. Even small amounts of gluten can trigger an immune response and cause inflammation in the small intestine, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and fatigue.

In addition to celiac disease, some individuals may have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which is characterized by gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing foods, in the absence of celiac disease or wheat allergy. However, the exact cause of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still not well understood and is an area of ongoing research.

Therefore, understanding gluten and its role in the body is crucial for individuals who may need to follow a gluten-free diet, whether it be for medical reasons or personal preference.

The Gluten Sensitivity Spectrum

  • Celiac Disease
    • Definition: An autoimmune disorder where ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine
    • Symptoms: Diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue, and anemia
    • Diagnosis: Blood tests and genetic testing
    • Treatment: Gluten-free diet under medical supervision
  • Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS)
    • Definition: Gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing foods in individuals who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy
    • Symptoms: Bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, and fatigue
    • Diagnosis: Elimination challenge and response to gluten-free diet
  • Wheat Allergy
    • Definition: An immune response to proteins in wheat, which can cause symptoms such as itching, swelling, and difficulty breathing
    • Symptoms: Hives, eczema, runny nose, sore throat, and wheezing
    • Diagnosis: Skin prick test, blood test, or food challenge
    • Treatment: Avoiding wheat and taking antihistamines or corticosteroids as needed

Note: The Gluten Sensitivity Spectrum is a broad term that encompasses the three distinct conditions of Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS), and Wheat Allergy. It is important to understand the differences between these conditions in order to determine the appropriate course of action for individuals who suspect they may have a gluten-related issue.

Common Symptoms of Gluten Sensitivity

  • Digestive issues
    • Abdominal pain
    • Diarrhea
    • Constipation
    • Bloating
  • Skin problems
    • Eczema
    • Psoriasis
    • Dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Brain fog
    • Memory problems
    • Focus issues
    • Mood changes
  • Fatigue
    • Chronic tiredness
    • Lack of energy
    • Inability to perform daily tasks

Gluten sensitivity can manifest in a variety of ways, and it is important to recognize the common symptoms associated with it. Some of the most frequently reported symptoms include digestive issues such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, and bloating. The skin can also be affected, with conditions like eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis herpetiformis being linked to gluten sensitivity. Brain fog, which can cause memory problems, focus issues, and mood changes, is another common symptom. Lastly, fatigue, characterized by chronic tiredness, lack of energy, and inability to perform daily tasks, is also associated with gluten sensitivity.

Who May Benefit from a Gluten-Free Diet?

Key takeaway: A gluten-free diet may be recommended by doctors for individuals with celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), or wheat allergy. Understanding gluten and its role in the body is crucial for individuals who may need to follow a gluten-free diet. Gluten sensitivity can manifest in a variety of ways, including digestive issues, skin problems, brain fog, and fatigue. Common symptoms of gluten sensitivity include abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis herpetiformis, memory problems, focus issues, and mood changes. It is important to differentiate between celiac disease, NCGS, and wheat allergy as they have different causes and treatments. Consulting a healthcare professional is crucial when transitioning to a gluten-free diet to ensure proper nutrition and management of symptoms. Additionally, gluten-free diets may benefit individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but only under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the small intestine. It is the most common reason for a doctor to recommend a gluten-free diet. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system reacts by damaging the lining of the small intestine, leading to malabsorption of nutrients. This can cause a wide range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss.

Symptoms and diagnosis of Celiac Disease

The symptoms of celiac disease can vary widely, and some people may have no symptoms at all. Common symptoms include:

  • Abdominal pain and discomfort
  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Bloating and gas
  • Nutrient deficiencies
  • Skin rashes or itching
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Depression or anxiety

Celiac disease is typically diagnosed through a combination of blood tests and biopsy of the small intestine. Blood tests can measure the levels of certain antibodies in the blood, which can indicate celiac disease. A biopsy can confirm the diagnosis by showing damage to the lining of the small intestine.

The long-term effects of untreated Celiac Disease

Untreated celiac disease can lead to a wide range of complications, including malnutrition, anemia, osteoporosis, and other health problems. In addition, people with celiac disease have a higher risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, such as thyroid disease and lupus. Therefore, it is important to follow a gluten-free diet to manage the symptoms and prevent long-term complications.

Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS)

Recognizing NCGS

Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) is a condition in which individuals experience gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing foods, in the absence of celiac disease or wheat allergy. The symptoms can vary in severity and may include abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and fatigue. It is important to note that NCGS is not an autoimmune disorder, and the exact cause of the condition is still not fully understood.

Diagnosis of NCGS

The diagnosis of NCGS is based on the patient’s symptoms and the exclusion of other gastrointestinal and medical conditions that could cause similar symptoms. There is currently no specific test to diagnose NCGS, and the diagnosis is primarily based on the patient’s self-reported symptoms and their improvement on a gluten-free diet.

Treatment options for NCGS

The treatment of NCGS involves adopting a gluten-free diet, which can help alleviate symptoms in some individuals. It is important to work with a healthcare provider or a registered dietitian to ensure that the individual is meeting their nutritional needs while following a gluten-free diet. In some cases, additional medications or therapies may be recommended to manage specific symptoms.

It is important to note that NCGS is not a life-threatening condition, and the decision to adopt a gluten-free diet should be based on the individual’s symptoms and their impact on their quality of life. It is also important to rule out other gastrointestinal conditions that could cause similar symptoms before considering a gluten-free diet.

Wheat Allergy

Wheat allergy is a condition in which the body’s immune system reacts to proteins found in wheat. It is important to differentiate wheat allergy from gluten sensitivity, as the two conditions have different causes and treatments.

Differentiating wheat allergy from gluten sensitivity

Wheat allergy is an immune response to proteins in wheat, while gluten sensitivity is a reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. The symptoms of wheat allergy can be similar to those of gluten sensitivity, but they are caused by a different mechanism.

Symptoms of wheat allergy

Symptoms of wheat allergy can range from mild to severe and can affect the skin, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, and cardiovascular system. Common symptoms include:

  • Skin reactions such as itching, hives, and eczema
  • Respiratory symptoms such as asthma, sneezing, and runny nose
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting
  • Cardiovascular symptoms such as low blood pressure and rapid heart rate

Treatment options for wheat allergy

The treatment of wheat allergy involves avoiding foods that contain wheat and taking antihistamines or other medications to alleviate symptoms. In severe cases, a person may require an epinephrine injection. In some cases, a person may outgrow a wheat allergy, but this is rare.

It is important to note that a gluten-free diet is not recommended for people with wheat allergy unless advised by a doctor. A gluten-free diet is designed to treat gluten sensitivity, not wheat allergy.

Other Conditions That May Benefit from a Gluten-Free Diet

While Celiac Disease is the most well-known condition that requires a gluten-free diet, there are other conditions that may benefit from eliminating gluten from one’s diet. Some of these conditions include:

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): IBD includes conditions such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause inflammation in the digestive tract. Some people with IBD may experience symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet, although the relationship between gluten and IBD is not fully understood.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): IBS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habits. While the evidence for the effectiveness of a gluten-free diet in treating IBS is mixed, some people with IBS may experience symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet.
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social and communication difficulties, as well as repetitive behaviors and interests. There is some evidence to suggest that a gluten-free diet may improve symptoms in some children with ASD, although more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of this approach.

It is important to note that a gluten-free diet should only be considered under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as eliminating gluten from one’s diet can have potential negative effects, such as decreased intake of important nutrients like fiber and B vitamins.

How to Transition to a Gluten-Free Diet

The Importance of Consulting a Healthcare Professional

When transitioning to a gluten-free diet, it is crucial to consult with a healthcare professional. A doctor or registered dietitian can help assess whether a gluten-free diet is necessary for your specific health needs. They can also provide guidance on how to safely and effectively eliminate gluten from your diet.

It is important to work with a healthcare professional who understands gluten sensitivity and the gluten-free diet. They can help you navigate the challenges of adopting a new diet and ensure that you are meeting your nutritional needs. They can also provide support and guidance as you work to manage any symptoms or health conditions related to gluten sensitivity.

Additionally, a healthcare professional can help you identify any hidden sources of gluten in your diet and provide recommendations for gluten-free alternatives. They can also provide guidance on how to read food labels and make informed choices when dining out or eating processed foods.

Overall, consulting with a healthcare professional is a crucial step in transitioning to a gluten-free diet. They can provide valuable guidance and support as you work to adopt a new way of eating that meets your specific health needs.

Navigating the Grocery Store

Transitioning to a gluten-free diet requires significant changes in one’s grocery shopping habits. This section provides a comprehensive guide to navigating the grocery store and making informed choices when it comes to gluten-free foods.

Understanding Gluten-Free Labels

Gluten-free labels are essential for identifying foods that are safe for consumption. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established specific guidelines for gluten-free labeling. According to these guidelines, a food product can be labeled as gluten-free if it contains less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten. It is crucial to understand these guidelines to ensure that one is consuming gluten-free foods that meet the necessary standards.

Reading Ingredient Lists

When shopping for gluten-free foods, it is essential to read ingredient lists carefully. Ingredients are listed in descending order, with the most significant component listed first. Therefore, it is essential to look for gluten-containing ingredients, such as wheat, barley, and rye, and ensure that they are not among the first few ingredients listed. It is also essential to look for hidden sources of gluten, such as modified food starch or maltodextrin, which may be used as fillers or binders in processed foods.

Common Gluten-Free Foods and Substitutions

While transitioning to a gluten-free diet, it is helpful to know which foods are generally safe to consume. Some common gluten-free foods include fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, fish, nuts, seeds, and legumes. However, it is essential to be cautious when consuming processed foods, as they may contain hidden sources of gluten.

When it comes to substitutions, there are several gluten-free flours and grains that can be used in place of wheat flour. These include rice flour, almond flour, coconut flour, and corn flour. Additionally, there are gluten-free alternatives to bread, pasta, and baked goods available in most grocery stores.

In conclusion, navigating the grocery store when transitioning to a gluten-free diet can be challenging, but with the right knowledge and resources, it is possible to make informed choices and maintain a healthy gluten-free lifestyle.

Cooking and Meal Planning

Transitioning to a gluten-free diet requires careful planning and attention to detail. One of the most crucial aspects of this diet is cooking and meal planning. Here are some essential tips to help you navigate this process:

  • Gluten-free cooking techniques: Cooking gluten-free meals can be challenging, but there are several techniques that can make the process easier. Some of these techniques include using gluten-free flours, such as rice flour, almond flour, and coconut flour, to replace wheat flour. Additionally, using gluten-free baking powder and xanthan gum can help achieve the desired texture and rise. It’s also important to note that not all ingredients are suitable for gluten-free cooking, so it’s crucial to do thorough research before starting.
  • Meal planning tips and resources: Meal planning is critical when transitioning to a gluten-free diet. It’s essential to plan meals in advance to ensure that you have all the necessary ingredients on hand. Additionally, using resources such as gluten-free cookbooks, websites, and apps can help you find new recipes and ideas. It’s also important to have a well-stocked pantry with gluten-free alternatives to common pantry items such as bread, pasta, and cereal.
  • Incorporating a variety of nutrient-dense foods: When transitioning to a gluten-free diet, it’s important to ensure that you’re still getting all the necessary nutrients. Some nutrient-dense gluten-free foods include fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds. Additionally, incorporating lean proteins such as chicken, fish, and tofu can help ensure that you’re getting enough protein. It’s also important to note that some gluten-free foods, such as processed snacks and baked goods, may be high in calories and sugar and should be consumed in moderation.

Managing Social Situations

Dining out with friends and family

When transitioning to a gluten-free diet, dining out with friends and family can be a challenge. Here are some tips to help you navigate social situations while maintaining your dietary restrictions:

  • Research restaurants: Before going out, research restaurants in the area to find ones that offer gluten-free options or are accommodating to dietary restrictions.
  • Communicate with the server: Inform the server about your dietary needs and ask for recommendations. They can help you make informed choices about the menu.
  • Ask for modifications: Don’t be afraid to ask for modifications to dishes or ask for them to be made without gluten-containing ingredients. Many dishes can be easily adapted to be gluten-free.

Traveling with a gluten-free diet

Traveling can present unique challenges when following a gluten-free diet. Here are some tips to help you stay on track while traveling:

  • Research ahead of time: Research restaurants, grocery stores, and markets in the area to find options that offer gluten-free foods.
  • Pack snacks: Pack gluten-free snacks for the road or during long trips to ensure you have access to safe food options.
  • Communicate with your accommodations: If you are staying in a hotel or rental property, communicate your dietary needs to the staff to ensure they can provide you with safe food options.

Dealing with the skepticism of others

When transitioning to a gluten-free diet, you may encounter skepticism from friends, family, or even healthcare professionals. Here are some tips to help you deal with skepticism:

  • Educate yourself: Learn as much as you can about gluten-free diets and the reasons for following one. This will help you respond to skepticism with informed answers.
  • Seek support: Connect with other individuals who follow a gluten-free diet for support and advice on how to deal with skepticism.
  • Consult with a healthcare professional: If you encounter skepticism from a healthcare professional, consult with another healthcare provider who is knowledgeable about gluten-free diets.

Tips for Maintaining a Healthy Gluten-Free Diet

Understanding Nutrient Needs

A gluten-free diet is a necessity for individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, but it can also be beneficial for others looking to improve their overall health. When following a gluten-free diet, it’s important to understand the nutrient needs that are essential for maintaining good health. Here are some key nutrients to focus on and common nutrient deficiencies to look out for:

Important nutrients to focus on in a gluten-free diet

  • Fiber: Fiber is an essential nutrient that helps regulate digestion, lower cholesterol levels, and maintain a healthy weight. Good sources of fiber include fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains such as brown rice and quinoa.
  • Iron: Iron is important for the production of red blood cells and helps to transport oxygen throughout the body. Good sources of iron include lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, and fortified cereals.
  • B vitamins: B vitamins are important for energy production, brain function, and the metabolism of fats and proteins. Good sources of B vitamins include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and leafy green vegetables.
  • Calcium: Calcium is important for strong bones and teeth, and plays a role in muscle function and nerve transmission. Good sources of calcium include dairy products, leafy green vegetables, and fortified plant-based milk alternatives.

Common nutrient deficiencies in people with gluten sensitivity

Individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may be at risk for certain nutrient deficiencies, including:

  • Iron: Up to 50% of people with celiac disease may have iron deficiency anemia.
  • B vitamins: People with celiac disease may be at risk for deficiencies in B vitamins, particularly B12.
  • Calcium: Individuals with celiac disease may be at risk for calcium deficiency, particularly in children and adolescents.
  • Fiber: A gluten-free diet may be low in fiber, which can lead to constipation and other digestive issues.

Food sources of key nutrients

To ensure you’re getting enough of these important nutrients, it’s important to incorporate a variety of gluten-free foods into your diet. Some good options include:

  • Fiber: Fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains such as brown rice and quinoa, and gluten-free breads and cereals.
  • Iron: Lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, lentils, and fortified cereals.
  • B vitamins: Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and leafy green vegetables.
  • Calcium: Dairy products, leafy green vegetables, and fortified plant-based milk alternatives.

Overall, understanding the nutrient needs of a gluten-free diet is crucial for maintaining good health. By incorporating a variety of gluten-free foods into your diet, you can ensure you’re getting enough of the essential nutrients your body needs.

Staying Mindful of Hidden Sources of Gluten

Gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, barley, and rye. For individuals with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, consuming gluten can cause inflammation and damage to the small intestine. Therefore, it is crucial to be mindful of hidden sources of gluten in the diet.

Here are some common gluten-containing ingredients to watch out for:

  • Modified food starch
  • Maltodextrin
  • Caramel color
  • Hydrolyzed vegetable protein
  • Textured vegetable protein
  • Soy sauce
  • Beer
  • Processed meats

When eating out at restaurants or attending social events, it is essential to ask questions about the ingredients used in the dishes. Many restaurants now offer gluten-free options, but it is still important to ensure that the dish is prepared without any gluten-containing ingredients.

When reading ingredient lists, look out for any of the above-mentioned ingredients or any ingredients that may contain gluten. Some ingredients may have modified or alternative names, such as maltodextrin, which may be listed as “hydrolyzed corn starch” or “dextrin.”

Additionally, it is important to be mindful of cross-contamination. Gluten can stick to surfaces and utensils, so it is crucial to ensure that gluten-free food is not contaminated by gluten-containing foods. Use separate cutting boards, utensils, and pans for gluten-free and gluten-containing foods to prevent cross-contamination.

In summary, staying mindful of hidden sources of gluten is crucial for individuals following a gluten-free diet. By being aware of common gluten-containing ingredients, asking questions when eating out, and being mindful of cross-contamination, individuals can maintain a healthy gluten-free diet.

Incorporating Variety and Flavor

  • Exploring different cultures and cuisines: One of the best ways to add variety to your gluten-free diet is to explore different cultures and cuisines. Many cultures have traditional gluten-free dishes that can be easily adapted to fit a gluten-free lifestyle. For example, traditional Mexican cuisine often includes corn tortillas, rice, and beans, which are all gluten-free. Similarly, traditional Asian cuisine includes many gluten-free ingredients such as rice, noodles, and vegetables.
  • Cooking techniques to add flavor without gluten: There are many cooking techniques that can be used to add flavor to gluten-free dishes without actually adding gluten. For example, using herbs and spices can add a lot of flavor to dishes without the need for gluten. Additionally, using olive oil or other healthy fats can help add flavor and moisture to gluten-free baked goods.
  • Incorporating herbs and spices: Herbs and spices can be a great way to add flavor to gluten-free dishes. They can be used to season meats, vegetables, and grains, and can be used to make gluten-free breads and other baked goods more flavorful. Some good options include cumin, chili powder, paprika, garlic powder, and ginger. Experimenting with different combinations of herbs and spices can help you create unique and delicious gluten-free meals.

Emotional Well-being

Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be challenging, both physically and emotionally. Coping with the emotional impact of a gluten-free diet is an important aspect of maintaining a healthy gluten-free lifestyle. Here are some tips to help you manage the emotional aspects of a gluten-free diet:

  • Seek support from friends and family: Sharing your journey with gluten intolerance with friends and family can help you feel less isolated and provide you with a support system. Encourage them to learn about gluten intolerance and how they can support you in your journey.
  • Join online communities: Connecting with others who have similar experiences can be helpful in managing the emotional impact of a gluten-free diet. Online communities can provide you with information, support, and recipe ideas.
  • Seek professional help if needed: If you are struggling emotionally with a gluten-free diet, consider seeking professional help. A mental health professional can help you navigate the emotional aspects of your journey and provide you with coping strategies.

Remember, maintaining a healthy gluten-free diet is a journey, and it’s important to take care of your emotional well-being along the way.

FAQs

1. What is a gluten-free diet?

A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes gluten, a type of protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. This diet is typically recommended for people with celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or wheat allergy.

2. What is celiac disease?

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the small intestine. When people with celiac disease eat gluten, their immune system reacts and causes damage to the lining of the small intestine, which can lead to malabsorption of nutrients and other problems.

3. What is non-celiac gluten sensitivity?

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a condition where people experience gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing foods, in the absence of celiac disease or wheat allergy. The exact cause of this condition is not yet fully understood.

4. Who should follow a gluten-free diet?

A gluten-free diet is typically recommended for people with celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, or wheat allergy. It may also be recommended for people with certain medical conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease or irritable bowel syndrome, as part of a treatment plan.

5. What are the benefits of a gluten-free diet?

A gluten-free diet can help people with celiac disease manage their symptoms and prevent long-term health problems. It may also improve symptoms for people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Additionally, a gluten-free diet may improve overall health and well-being, as it often includes more whole, unprocessed foods.

6. How do I know if I should follow a gluten-free diet?

If you are experiencing symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, or unexplained weight loss, you may want to speak with your doctor about a gluten-free diet. Your doctor can perform tests to determine if you have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

7. How do I transition to a gluten-free diet?

It is important to work with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian, to ensure that you are getting all the necessary nutrients while following a gluten-free diet. They can help you develop a plan to meet your individual needs and preferences.

8. What foods are allowed on a gluten-free diet?

A gluten-free diet typically includes foods such as fruits, vegetables, meat, poultry, fish, legumes, nuts, seeds, and gluten-free grains such as rice, quinoa, and corn. It is important to read food labels carefully and avoid hidden sources of gluten, such as modified food starch and maltodextrin.

9. What are some common sources of gluten?

Common sources of gluten include wheat, barley, rye, and triticale. Gluten can also be found in processed foods such as bread, pasta, cereal, and baked goods. It is important to read food labels carefully and avoid hidden sources of gluten.

10. Can I still eat out at restaurants on a gluten-free diet?

It can be challenging to eat out at restaurants on a gluten-free diet, as many restaurants may not be aware of the importance of avoiding cross contamination. It is important to communicate your dietary needs with the restaurant and ask questions about the ingredients used in the food. You may also want to consider bringing your own gluten-free foods as a precaution.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *